Use Technology to Move the Sun

It doesn’t take long looking through a gallery of my photographs to realize I enjoy photographing water in motion. Waterfalls, rapids, water flowing over a rock they all appeal to me. Maybe it is because I grew up in flat Essex County where water flowing over a rock is called “rain.”

In any case, I do enjoy photographing wider in motion.

Yesterday I delivered a dozen canvas mounted photographs to Marten Art Gallery in Bayfield for a one man show entitled H2Oh! and yes, they were primarily images of water.  Judy Stephenson, the gallery curator, had suggested the show should have a central theme. I was proud of the images I had selected. It will be a good opening show for her 2013 tourist season.

Waterfalls at Rock Glen, ON, Canada.

Waterfalls at Rock Glen, ON, Canada.

On the drive back I stopped in the town of Arkona, Ontario to check out the Rack Glen Conservation Area that my close friend Mark Clemens had shown me some years earlier. Rock Glen Falls is a lovely small waterfalls. While the lightning was acceptable, I felt it would have been better coming from a different direction.

Those of you who know me will attest there is a moderate amount of geek in my bones. I do like technology and the benefits it can deliver. Now, as Paul Harvey would say, here is the rest of the story.

The Photographer's Ephemeris showing the sunrise, sunset, moonrise and moonset for Tuesday, May 14, 2013. You can ask for the details for any date.

The Photographer’s Ephemeris on my iPad showing the sunrise, sunset, moonrise and moonset for Tuesday, May 14, 2013. You can set any date. If you will be outside of cell coverage then be sure to do a screen save at home.

I’d like to go back to Rock Glen to photograph. But what would be the best time of day to get there? For that I turn to my iPad app The Photographer’s Ephemeris. You can see why they call it TPE.

This amazing app combines satellite imagery similar to Google Maps with the movement of the sun and the moon. All I had to do was to type in Arkona, ON and TPE zoomed into the town. I dragged over to the North East and found the Conservation Area zooming in on the Falls. By sliding my finger over the timeline I can see where the sun rose and set. By saving the location (see the screen capture) I will be able to predict precisely where the sun will be at any given time on any date I may return. This is a phenomenal tool for photographers. If you want to see where the sun or moon will rise or set anywhere in the world I strongly urge you to download this app. It’s $10 well spent.

Enjoy,
Bob